Our Iowa Heritage: Old Capitol Iconic Moments – 100 Years Apart.

Since it’s inception in 1841, the Old Stone Capitol has been a gathering place for Iowa Citians. So many pictures have been taken over the years: pictures of big celebrations, graduations, picnics, and more.

But Old Capitol has been a place of mourning as well…

1865

Old Stone Capitol Remembers: In April 1865, mourners gathered for a memorial service for Abraham Lincoln. who was elected president in 1860 and assassinated on April 15, 1865. This photograph was taken by Issac A. Wetherby – click here to read his story.

1963

Old Stone Capitol Remembers: In November 1963, mourners gathered once again for a memorial service for John F. Kennedy who was elected president in 1960 and assassinated on November 22, 1963. This photograph was taken by Fred W. Kent – click here to read his story.

1968

Old Stone Capitol Remembers: In April 1968, mourners gathered once more for a memorial service for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., the civil rights activist who was assassinated on April 4, 1968. This photograph was taken by Fred W. Kent – click here to read his story.


(L-0076) In 1958-1959, on the 150th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln’s birth, the USPS issued four commemorative stamps honoring our 16th President.
(C-0202) John F. Kennedy Memorial. When John F. Kennedy was assassinated on the streets of Dallas on November 22, 1963, every American went into a state of shock. Much like 9/11, everyone who was alive in the 1960’s remembers where they were when they heard the news. Sadly, four sitting U.S. Presidents have been murdered: Abraham Lincoln (1865), James A. Garfield (1881), William McKinley (1901), and John F. Kennedy (1963). This interesting 1964 First Day Cover depicts those four assassinated presidents.
Two USPS stamps have been issued to honor Dr. King. The “I Have a Dream” speech is one of the subjects chosen for a 1999 commemorative stamp series honoring the most iconic events of the 1960’s. King’s speech was delivered during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom on August 28, 1963, in which he called for civil and economic rights and an end to racism in the United States. Delivered to over 250,000 civil rights supporters from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C., the speech was a defining moment of the civil rights movement and among the most iconic speeches in American history.

Kudos to the amazing resources below for the many quotes, photographs, etc. used on this page.

University of Iowa Libraries: Iowa Digital Library website

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