On The Road To Statehood – Celebrating 175 Years – 1832.

Sauk (Sac) & Fox Confederacy or The Meskwaki Tribe.

After the Black Hawk War of 1832, we find the United States government stepping in, for treaty-making purposes, and combining the two tribes into a single group known as the Sauk (Sac) & Fox Confederacy or The Meskwaki Tribe. It was during this time (1832-1833) when the Meskwaki people were forced from their villages on the Mississippi River, migrating westward into, what is today, east-central Iowa.

As European fur-traders began exploring the many rivers of this new territory, they built trading posts alongside the Sauk and Fox villages that had relocated on the Des Moines, Skunk, English, Iowa and Cedar Rivers.

READ MORE ABOUT THIS IOWA STORY HERE.


Click here to visit our 175th Statehood Anniversary page…

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On The Road To Statehood – Celebrating 175 Years – 1838.

The Ioway Tribe – Iowa Indians Who Visited London and Paris, George Catlin.

The Ioway Tribe. The name, Ioway, is not a word this Native American tribe used for themselves. Actually, the word the Ioways used (their autonym) is Báxoje (bah-kho-je – with alternate spellings: pahotcha or pahucha), which translates into “Grey Snow.”

Sadly, the word Ioway derives from an ethnic slur given to the Báxoje people by the Sioux nation; a word pronounced ayuhwa, which means “sleepy ones.” Early European explorers often adopted tribal names from these ethnonyms (ethnic nicknames), not understanding that these words were often very derogatory in nature, differing greatly from what the native people actually called themselves. Thus, ayuhwa (Iowa) is not a Báxoje (Ioway) word but is actually a slam against the very people Iowans wanted to honor.

The Iowa, or Ioway, lived for the majority of its recorded history in what is now the state of Iowa, but were pushed out of their homeland over a period of 14 years (1824-1838).

READ MORE ABOUT THIS IOWA STORY HERE.


Click here to visit our 175th Statehood Anniversary page…

Did you know? is an Our Iowa Heritage blog series that offers you a little bit of Iowa trivia from a large selection of stories on our website. Subscribe to this FREE blog and you’ll get a new email from us every Monday – Wednesday – Friday.

Join us for Our Iowa Heritage blog posts.

Learn some historical facts about Iowa City, Johnson County, or Eastern Iowa.

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On The Road To Statehood – Celebrating 175 Years – 2021.

Did you know???

This year, on December 28, 2021, Iowa will be celebrating it’s Quartoseptcentennial?

(That’s 175 years for those who don’t keep up with their Latin)

Over the next three months (October-November-December) we will be posting special 175th Anniversary “Did You Know?” posts. Join us for the fun.

Start here by reading about Iowa Statehood Day – December 28th.

CLICK HERE TO TAKE A QUARTOSEPTCENTENNIAL QUIZ…


Did you know? is an Our Iowa Heritage blog series that offers you a little bit of Iowa trivia from a large selection of stories on our website. Subscribe to this FREE blog and you’ll get a new email from us every Monday – Wednesday – Friday.

Join us for Our Iowa Heritage blog posts.

Learn some historical facts about Iowa City, Johnson County, or Eastern Iowa.

Amaze your friends.

Click to learn more.